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Printing and Framing Fly Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Invertebrate Animals:

Ant Prints | Bee Prints | Butterfly Prints | Caterpillar Prints | Clam Prints | Cockroach Prints | Crab Prints | Dragonfly Prints | Fly Prints | Gnat Prints | Grasshopper Prints | Hornet Prints | Jellyfish Prints | Lobster Prints | Locust Prints | Louse Prints | Mosquito Prints | Octopus Prints | Oyster Prints | Sand Dollar Prints | Sea Urchin Prints | Seahorse Prints | Seastar Prints | Snail Prints | Spider Prints | Squid Prints | Stinkbug Prints | Termite Prints | Wasp Prints | Worm Prints |

 

Fly Prints

Young fly name: maggot

A group of flys is called: swarm, cloud, business

Fly classification: dipterous

Fly class: Invertebrate

True flies are insects of the Order Diptera (Greek: di = two, and pteron = wing), possessing a single pair of wings on the mesothorax and a pair of halteres, derived from the hind wings, on the metathorax.

The presence of a single pair of wings distinguishes true flies from other insects with fly in their name, such as mayflies, dragonflies, damselflies, stoneflies, whiteflies, fireflies, alderflies, dobsonflies, snakeflies, sawflies, caddisflies, butterflies or scorpionflies. Some true flies have become secondarily wingless, especially in the superfamily Hippoboscoidea, or among those that are inquilines in social insect colonies.

Diptera is a large order, containing an estimated 240,000 species of mosquitos, gnats, midges and others, although under half of these (about 120,000 species) have been described. It is one of the major insect orders both in terms of ecological and human (medical and economic) importance. The Diptera, in particular the mosquitoes (Culicidae), are of great importance as disease transmitters, acting as vectors for malaria, dengue, West Nile virus, yellow fever, encephalitis and other infectious diseases.

There are two generally accepted suborders of Diptera. The Nematocera are usually recognized by their elongated bodies and feathery antennae as represented by mosquitoes and crane flies. The Brachycera tend to have a more roundly proportioned body and very short antennae. A more recent classification has been proposed in which the Nematocera is split into two suborders, the Archidiptera and the Eudiptera, but this has not yet gained widespread acceptance among dipterists.

Most of the Muscomorpha are further subdivided into the Acalyptratae and Calyptratae based on whether or not they have a calypter (a wing flap that extends over the halteres).

Beyond that, considerable revision in the taxonomy of the flies has taken place since the introduction of modern cladistic techniques, and much remains uncertain. The secondary ranks between the suborders and the families are more out of practical or historical considerations than out of any strict respect for phylogenetic classifications (some modern cladists tend to spurn the use of Linnaean rank names). Nearly all classifications in use now, including this article, contain some paraphyletic groupings; this is emphasized where the numerous alternative systems are most greatly at odds. See list of families of Diptera.

Dipterans belong to the group Mecopterida, that also contains Mecoptera, Siphonaptera, Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) and Trichoptera. Inside it, they are sometimes classified closely together with Mecoptera and Siphonaptera in the superorder Antliophora.

Diptera are usually thought to derive from Mecoptera or a strictly related group. First true dipterans are known from the Middle Triassic, becoming widespread during the Middle and Late Triassic .


Fly Trivia

What do you call a baby fly?
Answer: A baby fly is called a maggot.

What do you call a group of flys?
Answer: A group of flys are called a swarm, cloud, business.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a fly?
Answer: A fly has the scientific classification of dipterous.

Question: What class is a fly in?
Answer: A fly is in the invertebrate class.





young man flyfishing at sunrise
young man flyfishing at sunrise
 
 
 
silhouette of a fly board rider ...
silhouette of a fly board rider ...
 
 
 
turd on the ground. piece of...
turd on the ground. piece of...
 
 
 
house fly insect and cartoon...
house fly insect and cartoon...
 
 
 
fly icon silhouette vector...
fly icon silhouette vector...
 
 
 
hand drawn sketch of fly. retro ...
hand drawn sketch of fly. retro ...
 
 
 
freedom feel good and travel...
freedom feel good and travel...
 
 
 
 a macro shot of fly on a white ...
a macro shot of fly on a white ...
 
 
 
green fly isolated on white
green fly isolated on white
 
 
 
silhouette of a fly board rider ...
silhouette of a fly board rider ...
 
 
 
fly.
fly.
 
 
 
fly fisherman using flyfishing...
fly fisherman using flyfishing...
 
 
 
fly fishing rod  reel and...
fly fishing rod reel and...
 
 
 
 a macro shot of fly on a white ...
a macro shot of fly on a white ...
 
 
 
imagination fly abstract...
imagination fly abstract...