Gull
Gull Image
- Free Image Download

Printing and Framing Gull Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Bird Animals:

Albatross Prints | Chicken Prints | Cormorant Prints | Crane Prints | Crow Prints | Dove Prints | Duck Prints | Eagle Prints | Falcon Prints | Finch Prints | Goose Prints | Grouse Prints | Guinea Fowl Prints | Gull Prints | Hawk Prints | Heron Prints | Hummingbird Prints | Blue Jay Prints | Lark Prints | Lyrebird Prints | Magpie Prints | Mallard Prints | Nightingale Prints | Ostrich Prints | Owl Prints | Parrot Prints | Peafowl Prints | Pelican Prints | Penguin Prints | Quelea Prints | Rail Prints | Raven Prints | Rook Prints | Swallow Prints | Swan Prints | Woodpecker Prints | Wren Prints |

 

Gull Prints

Young gull name: chick, scorrie

Female gull: hen

Male gull: cock

A group of gulls is called: flock

Gull classification: larine

Gull class: Bird

Gulls (often informally Seagulls) are birds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae) and only distantly related to auks, and skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until recently, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now known to be polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera.

They are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls. They have stout, longish bills, and webbed feet. Gull species range in size from the Little Gull, at 120 g (4.2 oz) and 29 cm (11.5 inches), to the Great Black-backed Gull, at 1.75 kg (3.8 lbs) and 76 cm (30 inches).

Most gulls, particularly Larus species, are ground nesting carnivores, which will take live food or scavenge opportunistically. The live food often includes crabs and small fish. Apart from the kittiwakes, gulls are typically coastal or inland species, rarely venturing far out to sea and into surrounding deciduous forests. The large species take up to four years to attain full adult plumage, but two years is typical for small gulls. Large White-Headed Gulls are typically long-lived birds, with a maximum age of 49 years recorded for the Herring Gull.

Gulls nest in large, densely packed, and noisy colonies. They lay two to three speckled eggs in nests composed of vegetation. The young are precocial, being born with dark mottled down, and mobile from birth.

Gullsthe larger species in particularare resourceful, inquisitive and highly intelligent birds, demonstrating complex methods of communication and a highly developed social structure; for example, many gull colonies display mobbing behaviour, attacking and harassing would-be predators and other intruders. In addition, certain species (e.g. the Herring Gull) have exhibited tool use behaviour. Many species of gull have learned to coexist successfully with humans and have thrived in human habitats. Others rely on kleptoparasitism to get their food. The urban gull population in the United Kingdom has been growing quickly, probably due to laws such as the Clean Air Act 1956 which prohibited the burning of garbage by local landfill owners, thus increasing the availability of food for the gulls.

The taxonomy of gulls is confused by their widespread distribution and geneflow leading to zones of hybridization. Some have traditionally been considered ring species, but recent evidence suggest this assumption is questionable. Until recently, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now known to be polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of the genera Ichthyaetus, Chroicocephalus, Leucophaeus, Saundersilarus and Hydrocoloeus. Some English names refer to species complexes within the group:

In common usage, members of various gull species are often referred to as sea gulls or seagulls. This name is used by the layman to refer to a common local species or all gulls in general, and has no fixed taxonomic meaning.


Gull Trivia

What do you call a baby gull?
Answer: A baby gull is called a chick, scorrie.

What do you call a female gull?
Answer: A female gull is called a hen.

What do you call a male gull?
Answer: A male gull is called a cock.

What do you call a group of gulls?
Answer: A group of gulls are called a flock.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a gull?
Answer: A gull has the scientific classification of larine.

Question: What class is a gull in?
Answer: A gull is in the bird class.





vector set of beautiful...
vector set of beautiful...
 
 
 
flying kelp gull  larus...
flying kelp gull larus...
 
 
 
flying  juvenile kelp gull ...
flying juvenile kelp gull ...
 
 
 
sea gull  isolated on white...
sea gull isolated on white...
 
 
 
flying  adult kelp gull  larus...
flying adult kelp gull larus...
 
 
 
vector silhouettes of sea gulls ...
vector silhouettes of sea gulls ...
 
 
 
seabirds. set of beautiful...
seabirds. set of beautiful...
 
 
 
gulls icon
gulls icon
 
 
 
flying juvenile kelp gull ...
flying juvenile kelp gull ...
 
 
 
flying kelp gull  larus...
flying kelp gull larus...
 
 
 
herring gull  sea gull  gull ...
herring gull sea gull gull ...
 
 
 
colorful seagull bird vector...
colorful seagull bird vector...
 
 
 
black headed gull flying and...
black headed gull flying and...
 
 
 
urban gull in brighton
urban gull in brighton
 
 
 
girl wearing warm casual blue...
girl wearing warm casual blue...