Mosquito
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Printing and Framing Mosquito Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



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Mosquito Prints

Young mosquito name: nymph, wriggler, tumbler

A group of mosquitos is called: scourge, swarm, cloud

Mosquito classification: aedine, anopheline

Mosquito class: Invertebrate

Mosquitoes are insects in the family Culicidae. They have a pair of scaled wings, a pair of halteres, a slender body, and long legs. The females of most mosquito species suck blood (hematophagy) from other animals, which has made them the most deadly disease vector known, killing millions of people over thousands of years and continuing to kill millions per year by the spread of infectious diseases.

Length varies but is rarely greater than 16 mm (0.6 inch), and weight up to 2.5 mg (0.04 grain). A mosquito can fly for 1 to 4 hours continuously at up to 12 km/h travelling up to 10 km in a night. Most species are nocturnal or crepuscular (dawn or dusk) feeders. During the heat of the day most mosquitoes rest in a cool place and wait for the evenings. They may still bite if disturbed. Mosquitos are adept at infiltration and have been known to find their way into residences via deactivated air conditioning units.

Both male and female mosquitoes are nectar feeders, but the females of many species are also capable of hematophagy (drinking blood). Females do not require blood for their own survival, but they do need supplemental substances (like protein and iron) to develop eggs. Prior to and during blood feeding, they inject saliva into the bodies of their source(s) of blood. Female mosquitoes hunt their blood host by detecting carbon dioxide (CO2) and 1-Octen-3-ol from a distance.

Mosquitoes of the genus Toxorhynchites never drink blood. This genus includes the largest extant mosquitoes, the larvae of which prey on the larvae of other mosquitoes. These mosquito eaters have been used in the past as mosquito control agents, with varying success.

In order for the mosquito to obtain a blood meal it must surmount the vertebrate physiological responses. The mosquito, as with all blood-feeding arthropods, has evolved mechanisms to effectively block the hemostasis system with their saliva which contains a complex mixture of secreted proteins. Mosquito saliva affects vascular constriction, blood clotting, platelet aggregation, inflammation, immunity, and angiogenesis. Universally, hematophagous arthropod saliva contains at least one anticlotting, one anti-platelet, and one vasodilatory substance. Mosquito saliva also contains enzymes that aid in sugar feeding and antimicrobial agents to control bacterial growth in the sugar meal. The composition of mosquito saliva is relatively simple as it usually contains fewer than 20 dominant proteins. Despite the great strides in knowledge of these molecules and their role in bloodfeeding achieved recently, scientists still cannot ascribe functions to more than half of the molecules found in arthropod saliva.

T cell populations are decidedly susceptible to the suppressive effect of mosquito saliva, showing enhanced mortality and decreased division rates. Parallel work by Wasserman et al. (2004) demonstrated that T- and B-cell proliferation was inhibited in a dose dependent manner with concentrations as low as 1/7th of the saliva in a single mosquito. Depinay et al. (2005) observed a suppression of antibody-specific T cell responses mediated by mosquito saliva and dependent on mast cells and IL-10 expression. A recent study suggests that mosquito saliva can also decrease expression of interferon/ during early mosquito-borne virus infection. The contribution of type I interferons (IFN) in recovery from infection with viruses has been demonstrated in vivo by the therapeutic and prophylactic effects of administration of IFN-inducers or IFN, and recent research suggests that mosquito saliva exacerbates West Nile virus infection, as well as other mosquito-transmitted viruses.


Mosquito Trivia

What do you call a baby mosquito?
Answer: A baby mosquito is called a nymph, wriggler, tumbler.

What do you call a group of mosquitos?
Answer: A group of mosquitos are called a scourge, swarm, cloud.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a mosquito?
Answer: A mosquito has the scientific classification of aedine, anopheline.

Question: What class is a mosquito in?
Answer: A mosquito is in the invertebrate class.





set of mosquito silhouettes...
set of mosquito silhouettes...
 
 
 
mosquito on human skin at sunset
mosquito on human skin at sunset
 
 
 
zica virus aedes aegypti...
zica virus aedes aegypti...
 
 
 
 insect. a realistic mosquito....
insect. a realistic mosquito....
 
 
 
close up of a mosquito sucking...
close up of a mosquito sucking...
 
 
 
mosquito bite isolated on white
mosquito bite isolated on white
 
 
 
a close up or macro of a...
a close up or macro of a...
 
 
 
running mosquito
running mosquito
 
 
 
signaling  mosquitoes with...
signaling mosquitoes with...
 
 
 
anti mosquito sign with a funny ...
anti mosquito sign with a funny ...
 
 
 
mosquito on a human hand...
mosquito on a human hand...
 
 
 
little asian girl has allergies ...
little asian girl has allergies ...
 
 
 
super macro dangerous zica...
super macro dangerous zica...
 
 
 
mosquito isolated on white...
mosquito isolated on white...
 
 
 
signaling  mosquitoes with...
signaling mosquitoes with...