Ostrich
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Printing and Framing Ostrich Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



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Ostrich Prints

Young ostrich name: hatchling, chick

Female ostrich: hen

Male ostrich: cock

A group of ostrichs is called: flock, troop

Ostrich classification: ratite, struthious

Ostrich class: Bird

The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is a large flightless bird native to Africa (and formerly the Middle East). It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae, and its genus, Struthio. Ostriches share the order Struthioniformes with the Emu, kiwis, and other ratites. It is distinctive in its appearance, with a long neck and legs and the ability to run at speeds of about 74 km/h (46 mph), the top land speed of any bird. The ostrich is the largest living species of bird and lays the largest egg of any bird species.

The diet of the ostrich mainly consists of plant matter, though it eats insects. It lives in nomadic groups which contain between five and 50 birds. When threatened, the ostrich will either hide itself by lying flat against the ground, or will run away. If cornered, it can cause injury and death with a kick from its powerful legs. Mating patterns differ by geographical region, but territorial males fight for a harem of two to seven females.

The ostrich is farmed around the world, particularly for its feathers, which are decorative and are also used for feather dusters. Its skin is used for leather and its meat marketed commercially.

The ostrich was originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th-century work, Systema Naturae under its current binomial name. Its scientific name is derived from the Greek words for camel sparrow alluding to its long neck.

The ostrich belongs to the Struthioniformes order of ratites. Other members include rheas, emu, cassowaries and the largest bird ever, the now-extinct Elephant Bird (Aepyornis). However, the classification of the ratites as a single order has always been questioned, with the alternative classification restricting the Struthioniformes to the ostrich lineage and elevating the other groups. Presently, molecular evidence is equivocal while paleobiogeographical and paleontological considerations are slightly in favor of the multi-order arrangement.

Five subspecies are recognized:

The population from Ro de Oro was once separated as Struthio camelus spatzi because its eggshell pores were shaped like a teardrop and not round, but as there is considerable variation of this character and there were no other differences between these birds and adjacent populations of S. c. camelus, it is no longer considered valid. This population disappeared in the later half of the 20th century. In addition, there have been 19th century reports of the existence of small ostriches in North Africa; these have been referred to as Levaillant's Ostrich (Struthio bidactylus) but remain a hypothetical form not supported by material evidence. Given the persistence of savanna wildlife in a few mountainous regions of the Sahara (such as the Tagant Plateau and the Ennedi Plateau), it is not at all unlikely that ostriches too were able to persist in some numbers until recent times after the drying-up of the Sahara.


Ostrich Trivia

What do you call a baby ostrich?
Answer: A baby ostrich is called a hatchling, chick.

What do you call a female ostrich?
Answer: A female ostrich is called a hen.

What do you call a male ostrich?
Answer: A male ostrich is called a cock.

What do you call a group of ostrichs?
Answer: A group of ostrichs are called a flock, troop.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a ostrich?
Answer: A ostrich has the scientific classification of ratite, struthious.

Question: What class is a ostrich in?
Answer: A ostrich is in the bird class.





ostrich and ostrich eggs on the ...
ostrich and ostrich eggs on the ...
 
 
 
portrait of a ostrich on white...
portrait of a ostrich on white...
 
 
 
ostriches in the paddock of the ...
ostriches in the paddock of the ...
 
 
 
ostrich burying head in sand...
ostrich burying head in sand...
 
 
 
scared ostrich burying its head ...
scared ostrich burying its head ...
 
 
 
ostrich on the african savannah
ostrich on the african savannah
 
 
 
cute ostrich in flat style...
cute ostrich in flat style...
 
 
 
ostrich running across the...
ostrich running across the...
 
 
 
ostrich running vector black...
ostrich running vector black...
 
 
 
ostrich bird head and neck...
ostrich bird head and neck...
 
 
 
ostrich full length isolated on ...
ostrich full length isolated on ...
 
 
 
funny ostrich at ostrich farm....
funny ostrich at ostrich farm....
 
 
 
ostrich running across the...
ostrich running across the...
 
 
 
wordcard for wild ostrich...
wordcard for wild ostrich...
 
 
 
african animals set. elephant ...
african animals set. elephant ...