Raccoon
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Printing and Framing Raccoon Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



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Raccoon Prints

Young raccoon name: cub, kit

Female raccoon: sow

Male raccoon: boar

A group of raccoons is called: nursery, gaze

Raccoon classification: procyonine

Raccoon class: Mammal

The raccoon (Procyon lotor), sometimes spelled as racoon, and also known as the common raccoon, North American raccoon, northern raccoon and colloquially as coon, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. As a result of escapes and deliberate introductions in the mid-20th century, raccoons are now also distributed across the European mainland, the Caucasus region and Japan. Their original habitats are deciduous and mixed forests, but due to their adaptability they have extended their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes, and even urban areas, where some home owners consider them to be pests.

With a body length between 41 and 71 cm (16.128.0 in) and a weight between 3.6 and 9.0 kg (7.919.8 lb), the raccoon is the largest procyonid. The dense underfur, which insulates against cold weather, accounts for almost 90% of its grayish coat. Two of the most distinctive features of the raccoon are its extremely sensitive front paws and facial mask, which are also themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes. Studies have shown that raccoons are able to remember the solution to tasks up to three years later. The diet of the omnivorous and usually nocturnal raccoon consists of about 40% invertebrates, 33% plant foods and 27% vertebrates. Captive raccoons sometimes douse their food before eating it, which is most likely a vacuum activity imitating foraging at shores.

Though previously thought to be solitary, there is now evidence that raccoons engage in gender-specific social behaviors. Related females often share a common area, while unrelated males live together in groups of up to four animals to maintain their positions against foreign males during the mating season and other potential invaders. Home range sizes vary anywhere from 0.03 km2 (0.01 mi2) for females in cities to 49.5 km2 (19.1 mi2) for males in prairies. After a gestation period of about 65 days, two to five young are born in spring. The kits are subsequently raised by their mother until dispersion in late fall. Although captive raccoons have been known to live over 20 years, their average life expectancy in the wild is only 1.8 to 3.1 years. Hunting and traffic accidents are the two most common causes of death in many areas.

The word raccoon is derived from the Algonquin word ahrah-koon-emalthough other transcriptions existwhich was the pronunciation used by Chief Powhatan and his daughter Pocahontas, meaning one who rubs, scrubs and scratches with its hands. Similarly, Spanish colonists adopted the Spanish word mapache from the Nahuatl word mapachitli of the Aztecs, meaning one who takes everything in its hands. In many languages, the raccoon is named for its characteristic dousing behavior in conjunction with that language's term for bear, for example Waschbr in German, orsetto lavatore in Italian and araiguma () in Japanese. The colloquial abbreviation coon is used in words like coonskin for fur clothing and in phrases like old coon as a self-designation of trappers.

In the first decades after its discovery by the members of the expedition of Christopher Columbus, who was the first person to leave a written record about the species, taxonomists thought the raccoon was related to many different species, including dogs, cats, badgers and particularly bears. Carl Linnaeus, the father of modern taxonomy, placed the raccoon in the genus Ursus, first as Ursus cauda elongata (long-tailed bear) in the second edition of his Systema Naturae, then as Ursus Lotor (washer bear) in the tenth edition. In 1780, Gottlieb Conrad Christian Storr placed the raccoon in its own genus Procyon, which can be translated to mean either before the dog or doglike. It is also possible that Storr had its nocturnal lifestyle in mind and chose the star Procyon as eponym for the species.


Raccoon Trivia

What do you call a baby raccoon?
Answer: A baby raccoon is called a cub, kit.

What do you call a female raccoon?
Answer: A female raccoon is called a sow.

What do you call a male raccoon?
Answer: A male raccoon is called a boar.

What do you call a group of raccoons?
Answer: A group of raccoons are called a nursery, gaze.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a raccoon?
Answer: A raccoon has the scientific classification of procyonine.

Question: What class is a raccoon in?
Answer: A raccoon is in the mammal class.





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funny raccoon sitting isolated...
 
 
 
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raccoon set with standing...
 
 
 
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cartoon animal cute raccoon on ...
 
 
 
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the raccoon procyon lotor ...
 
 
 
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portrait of a funny raccoon ...
 
 
 
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very cute and funny baby...
 
 
 
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raccoon 9 months procyon...
 
 
 
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black and white linear paint...
 
 
 
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raccoon portrait
 
 
 
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animals of north america big...
 
 
 
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video chat effects animal faces ...
 
 
 
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raccoon. black white hand drawn ...
 
 
 
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watercolor raccoon forest...
 
 
 
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raccoon american raccoon in...