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Printing and Framing Ram Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Mammal Animals:

Aardvark Prints | Alpaca Prints | American Bison Prints | Anteater Prints | Antelope Prints | Ape Prints | Armadillo Prints | Donkey Prints | Baboon Prints | Badger Prints | Bat Prints | Bear Prints | Beaver Prints | Bison Prints | Boar Prints | Buffalo Prints | Bush Baby Prints | Camel Prints | Caribou Prints | Cat Prints | Chamois Prints | Cheetah Prints | Chimpanzee Prints | Chinchilla Prints | Coyote Prints | Deer Prints | Dinosaur Prints | Dog Prints | Dolphin Prints | Dugong Prints | Echidna Prints | Eland Prints | Elephant Prints | Elephant Seal Prints | Elk Prints | Emu Prints | Ferret Prints | Fox Prints | Gaur Prints | Gazelle Prints | Gerbil Prints | Giant Panda Prints | Giraffe Prints | Gnu Prints | Goat Prints | Gopher Prints | Gorilla Prints | Guanaco Prints | Guinea Pig Prints | Hamster Prints | Hare Prints | Hedgehog Prints | Hippopotamus Prints | Human Prints | Hyena Prints | Jackal Prints | Jaguar Prints | Kangaroo Prints | Koala Prints | Kouprey Prints | Kudu Prints | Lemur Prints | Leopard Prints | Lion Prints | Llama Prints | Loris Prints | Manatee Prints | Meerkat Prints | Mink Prints | Mole Prints | Monkey Prints | Moose Prints | Mouse Prints | Mule Prints | Narwhal Prints | Okapi Prints | Opossum Prints | Oryx Prints | Otter Prints | Ox Prints | Panther Prints | Pig Prints | Platypus Prints | Pony Prints | Porcupine Prints | Porpoise Prints | Prairie Dog Prints | Rabbit Prints | Raccoon Prints | Ram Prints | Rat Prints | Red Deer Prints | Red Panda Prints | Rhinoceros Prints | Sea Lion Prints | Seal Prints | Serval Prints | Shark Prints | Sheep Prints | Shrew Prints | Skunk Prints | Squirrel Prints | Tapir Prints | Tarsier Prints | Tiger Prints | Turkey Prints | Vicuna Prints | Wallaby Prints | Walrus Prints | Water Buffalo Prints | Weasel Prints | Whale Prints | Wolf Prints | Wombat Prints | Yak Prints | Zebra Prints |

 

Ram Prints

Young ram name: lamb

Female ram: ewe

Male ram: ram

A group of rams is called: flock

Ram classification: arietine, ovine

Ram class: Mammal

Domestic sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals kept as livestock. Like all ruminants, sheep are even-toed ungulates, also commonly called cloven-hoofed animals. Although the name sheep applies to many species, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis aries. Domestic sheep are the most numerous species in their genus, and are most likely descended from the wild mouflon of Europe and Asia.

One of the earliest animals to be domesticated for agricultural purposes, sheep are primarily valued for their fleece and meat. A sheep's wool is the most widely used of any animal, and is typically harvested by shearing. Ovine meat is called lamb when from younger animals and mutton when from older ones. They continue to be important for wool and meat today, and are also occasionally raised for pelts, as dairy animals, or as model organisms for science.

Sheep husbandry is practised throughout the inhabited world, and has played a pivotal role in many civilizations. In the modern era, Australia, New Zealand, Patagonian nations, and the United Kingdom are most closely associated with sheep production. Sheep-raising has a large lexicon of unique terms which vary considerably by region and dialect. Use of the word sheep began in Middle English as a derivation of the Old English word scap; it is both the singular and plural name for the animal. A group of sheep is called a flock, herd or mob. Adult female sheep are referred to as ewes, intact males as rams, castrated males as wethers, and younger sheep as lambs. Many other specific terms for the various life stages of sheep exist, generally related to lambing, shearing, and age.

Being a key animal in the history of farming, sheep have a deeply entrenched place in human culture, and find representation in much modern language and symbology. As livestock, sheep are most-often associated with pastoral, Arcadian imagery. Sheep figure in many mythologiessuch as the Golden Fleeceand major religions, especially the Abrahamic traditions. In both ancient and modern religious ritual, sheep are used as sacrificial animals. In contemporary English language usage, people who are timid, easily led, or stupid are often compared to sheep.

Etymologically, the word modern English language speakers now use to denote ovines is derived from the Old English term scap, which is akin to the Old High German scf and probably ultimately originated from Proto-Germanic or Gothic. Before AD 1200, English spelling preferred scheap, and the shift to the currently used spelling did not occur until about 1280.

The word ram derives from the Old English rom (dated to 725) and subsequently ramm (in use before 1325). The word has always been closely associated with implements used in the application of force, such as the battering ram or the weight of a pile driver, but its earliest usage is in reference to male sheep. Before 1300, ewe was usually written as ouwe, and it stems from the Old English owu. Lamb is thought to be the oldest ovine term still used in an unchanged form; its first appearance is in 858. It sprang from the Old English lomb (dated to 725), and the verb form is first recorded from 1611.

Another trait unique to sheep are their wide variation in color. Wild sheep are largely variations of brown hues. Colors of domestic sheep range from pure white to dark chocolate brown and even spotted or piebald. Selection for easily dyeable white fleeces began early in sheep domestication, and as white wool is a dominant trait it spread quickly. However, colored sheep do appear in many modern breeds, and may even appear as a recessive trait in white flocks. While white wool is desirable for large commercial markets, there is a niche market for colored fleeces, mostly for handspinning.


Ram Trivia

What do you call a baby ram?
Answer: A baby ram is called a lamb.

What do you call a female ram?
Answer: A female ram is called a ewe.

What do you call a male ram?
Answer: A male ram is called a ram.

What do you call a group of rams?
Answer: A group of rams are called a flock.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a ram?
Answer: A ram has the scientific classification of arietine, ovine.

Question: What class is a ram in?
Answer: A ram is in the mammal class.





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