Red Deer
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Printing and Framing Red Deer Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

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Red Deer Prints

Young red deer name: calf

Female red deer: hind

Male red deer: stag

A group of red deers is called: herd

Red Deer class: Mammal

The Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) is one of the largest deer species. The Red Deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor and parts of western and central Asia. It also inhabits the Atlas Mountains region between Morocco and Tunisia in northwestern Africa, being the only species of deer to inhabit Africa. Red Deer have been introduced to other areas including Australia, New Zealand and Argentina. In many parts of the world the meat (venison) from Red Deer is widely used as a food source.

Red Deer are ruminants, characterized by an even number of toes, and a four-chambered stomach. Recent DNA evidence indicates that the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) and the East Asian and North American Elk (Wapiti) (Cervus canadensis) represent two distinct species. They also hint at an additional primordial subgroup of Central Asian Red Deer. The ancestor of all Red Deer probably originated in Central Asia and likely resembled Sika Deer.

Although at one time Red Deer were rare in some areas, they were never close to extinction. Reintroduction and conservation efforts, especially in the United Kingdom, have resulted in an increase of Red Deer populations, while other areas, such as North Africa, have continued to show a population decline.

The Red Deer is one of the largest deer species. It is a ruminant, eating its food in two stages and having an even number of toes on each hoof, similar to camels, goats and cattle. European Red Deer have a longer relative tail length compared to their Asian and North American relatives. There are subtle differences in appearance between the various subspecies of Red Deer primarily in size and antlers with the smallest being the Corsican Red Deer found on the islands of Corsica and Sardinia and the largest being the Caspian red deer (or maral) of Asia Minor and the Caucasus Region to the west of the Caspian Sea. The deer of Central and Western Europe vary greatly in size with some of the largest deer found in the Carpathian Mountains in Central Europe. West European Red Deer historically, grew to large size given ample food supply (including peoples' crops), and descendants of introduced populations living in New Zealand and Argentina have grown quite large in size and antlers. Large Red Deer stags, like the Caspian Red Deer or those of the Carpathian Mountains may rival the Wapiti in size. Note that the large size is applied to male deer only. Female Red Deer are much smaller.

Generally, the male (stag) Red Deer is typically 175230 cm (69-91 in) long and weighs 160240 kg (350530 lbs); the female is 160210 cm (6383 in) and weighs 120170 kg (264374 lbs). The tail adds another 12-19 cm (5-7.5 in) and shoulder height is about 105-120 cm (41-48 in). Size varies in different subspecies with the largest, the huge but small-antlered deer of the Carpathian Mountains (C. e. elaphus), weighing up to 500 kg (1,100 lbs). At the other end of the scale, the Corsican Red Deer (C. e. corsicanus) weighs about 80-100 kg (176-220 lbs), although Red Deer introduced to other parts of the world can weigh as little as 53 kg (117 lbs). European Red Deer tend to be reddish-brown in their summer coats. All Red Deer subspecies are between 2.1 and 2.4 metres (7 to 8 ft) in length from nose to tail. The males of many subspecies also grow a short neck mane (mane of hair around their necks) during the autumn. The male deer of the British Isles and Norway tend to have the thickest and most noticeable neck manes, relative to the other subspecies. Male Caspian Red Deer (Cervus elaphus maral) and Spanish Red Deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) do not carry neck manes. Male deer of all subspecies, however, tend to have stronger and thicker neck muscles than female deer, which may give them an appearance of having neck manes. Red Deer hinds (females) do not have neck manes. The European Red Deer is adapted to a woodland environment.

Only the stags have antlers which start growing in the spring and are shed each year, usually at the end of winter. Antlers are made of bone which can grow at a rate of 2.5 centimetres (1 in) a day. A soft covering known as velvet helps to protect newly forming antlers in the spring. European red deer antlers are distinctive in being rather straight and rugose, with the fourth and fifth tines forming a crown or cup in larger males. Any tines in excess of the fourth and fifth tine will grow radially from the cup. Cups are generally absent in the antlers of smaller red deer such as Corsican Red Deer. West European Red Deer antlers feature bez (second) tines that are either absent or smaller than the brow tine. However, bez tines occur frequently in Norwegian Red Deer. Antlers of Caspian Red Deer carry large bez (second) tines and form less-developed cups than West European red deer. A stag can (exceptionally) have smooth antlers, and is then known as a switch. Similarly, a stag that doesn't grow antlers is a hummel. The antlers are testosterone driven and as the stag's testosterone levels drop in the autumn, the velvet is shed and the antlers stop growing.

During the autumn, all Red Deer subspecies grow a thicker coat of hair which helps to insulate them during the winter. Autumn is also when some of the stags grow their neck manes. It is in the autumn/winter coat that distinguishes most subspecies. The Caspian Red Deer's winter coat is greyer and has a larger and more distinguished light rump-patch (similar to Wapitis and some Central Asian Red Deer) compared to the West European Red Deer which is more of a greyish-brown coat with a darker yellowish rump patch in the winter. By the time summer begins, the heavy winter coat has been shed; the animals are known to rub against trees and other objects to help remove hair from their bodies. Red Deer have different colouration based on the seasons and types of habitats, with grey or lighter colouration prevalent in the winter and a more reddish and darker coat in the summer. Most European Red Deer wear a reddish-brown summer coat, and some individuals may have a few spots on the backs of their summer coats.

Cervus genus ancestors of Red Deer first appear in fossil records 12 million years ago during the Pliocene in Eurasia. An extinct species, known as the Irish Elk (Megaloceros) was not related to the red deer but to the fallow deer, was the largest member of the deer family known from the fossil record.


Red Deer Trivia

What do you call a baby red deer?
Answer: A baby red deer is called a calf.

What do you call a female red deer?
Answer: A female red deer is called a hind.

What do you call a male red deer?
Answer: A male red deer is called a stag.

What do you call a group of red deers?
Answer: A group of red deers are called a herd.

Question: What class is a red deer in?
Answer: A red deer is in the mammal class.





a young red deer stag.
a young red deer stag.
 
 
 
stunning image of red deer stag ...
stunning image of red deer stag ...
 
 
 
dusk landscape of the red deer...
dusk landscape of the red deer...
 
 
 
solitary red deer stag with big ...
solitary red deer stag with big ...
 
 
 
red deer on green meadow  isle...
red deer on green meadow isle...
 
 
 
scottish red deer stag isolated ...
scottish red deer stag isolated ...
 
 
 
red deer in morning sun.
red deer in morning sun.
 
 
 
large majestic red deer stag...
large majestic red deer stag...
 
 
 
stunning image of red deer stag ...
stunning image of red deer stag ...
 
 
 
red deer stag in autumn woodland
red deer stag in autumn woodland
 
 
 
portrait of majestic powerful...
portrait of majestic powerful...
 
 
 
red deer stag in front of a...
red deer stag in front of a...
 
 
 
red deer in mating season
red deer in mating season
 
 
 
kingly red deer
kingly red deer
 
 
 
red deer stags  cervus elaphus  ...
red deer stags cervus elaphus ...