Salamander
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Printing and Framing Salamander Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Amphibian Animals:

Frog Prints | Newt Prints | Salamander Prints | Toad Prints |

 

Salamander Prints

Young salamander name: tadpole, salamanderling

Female salamander: sow

Male salamander: boar

A group of salamanders is called: maelstrom, band

Salamander classification: caudatan

Salamander class: Amphibian

The common name for a group of approximately 500 species of amphibians. They are typically characterized by slender bodies, short noses, and long tails. All known fossil and extant species fall under the order Caudata, while sometimes the extant species are grouped together as the Urodela. Most salamanders have four front toes and their hind legs have five. Their moist skin usually makes them reliant on habitats in or near water, or under some protection (e.g., moist ground), often in a wetland. Some salamander species are fully aquatic throughout life, some take to the water intermittently, and some are entirely terrestrial as adults. Uniquely among vertebrates, they are capable of regenerating lost limbs, as well as other body parts.

Mature salamanders generally have a body form similar to that of lizards, with slender bodies, long tails, and four limbs. However, like some lizards, many species of salamander have reduced or absent limbs, giving them a more eel-like appearance. Most species that have limbs have four toes on the forelimbs, and five on the hind limbs, and lack claws. Salamanders are often brightly coloured, either in both sexes throughout the year, or only in the males, especially during the breeding season. However, the species dwelling entirely underground are often white or pink, lacking any skin pigment.

Many salamanders are relatively small, but there are definite exceptions. They range in size from the minute salamanders, with a total length of 2.7 centimetres (1.1 in), including the tail, to the Chinese giant salamander which reaches 1.8 metres (5.9 ft) and weighs up to 65 kg (140 lb). Most, however, are between 10 centimetres (3.9 in) and 20 centimetres (7.9 in) in length. Salamanders regularly shed the outer layer of their skin (the epidermis) as they grow, and then eat the resulting slough.

Respiration differs among the different species of salamanders. Species that lack lungs respire through gills. In most cases, these are external gills, visible as bright red tufts either side of the head, although the amphiumas have internal gills and gill slits. Some salamanders that are terrestrial have lungs that are used in respiration, although these are simple and sac-like, unlike the more complex organs found in mammals. Many species, such as the olm, have both lungs and gills as adults.

Some terrestrial species lack both lungs and gills and perform gas exchange through their skin, a process known as valerian respiration in which the capillary beds are spread throughout the epidermis, and inside the mouth. Even some species with lungs can respire through the skin in this manner.

The skin of salamanders secretes , which helps keep the animal moist when on dry land, and maintains their salt balance while in water, as well as providing a lubricant during swimming. Many salamanders also secrete poison from glands in their skin, and some additionally have skin glands for secreting courtship pheromones.

Hunting is yet another unique aspect of salamanders. In the lungless salamanders, muscles surrounding the hyoid bone contract to create pressure and actually shoot the hyoid bone out of the mouth along with the tongue. The tip of the tongue is composed of a mucus which creates a sticky end to which the prey is captured. Muscles in the pelvic region are used in order to reel the tongue and the hyoid back to its original position.

To find their prey, salamanders use trichromatic color vision in the ultraviolet range based on three photoreceptor types maximally sensitive around 450 nanometres (1.8105 in), 500 nm and 570 nm. Permanantly subterranean salamanders have reduced eyes, which may even be covered by a layer of skin. The larvae, and the adults of some highly aquatic species, also have a lateral line organ, similar to that of fish, which can detect changes in water pressure. Salamanders have no external ear, and only a vestigial middle ear.


Salamander Trivia

What do you call a baby salamander?
Answer: A baby salamander is called a tadpole, salamanderling.

What do you call a female salamander?
Answer: A female salamander is called a sow.

What do you call a male salamander?
Answer: A male salamander is called a boar.

What do you call a group of salamanders?
Answer: A group of salamanders are called a maelstrom, band.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a salamander?
Answer: A salamander has the scientific classification of caudatan.

Question: What class is a salamander in?
Answer: A salamander is in the amphibian class.





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