Termite
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Printing and Framing Termite Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Invertebrate Animals:

Ant Prints | Bee Prints | Butterfly Prints | Caterpillar Prints | Clam Prints | Cockroach Prints | Crab Prints | Dragonfly Prints | Fly Prints | Gnat Prints | Grasshopper Prints | Hornet Prints | Jellyfish Prints | Lobster Prints | Locust Prints | Louse Prints | Mosquito Prints | Octopus Prints | Oyster Prints | Sand Dollar Prints | Sea Urchin Prints | Seahorse Prints | Seastar Prints | Snail Prints | Spider Prints | Squid Prints | Stinkbug Prints | Termite Prints | Wasp Prints | Worm Prints |

 

Termite Prints

Young termite name: larva

Female termite: cow

Male termite: bull

A group of termites is called: colony, swarm

Termite class: Invertebrate

The termites are a group of social insects usually classified at the taxonomic rank of order Isoptera (but see also taxonomy below). As truly social animals, they are termed eusocial along with the ants and some bees and wasps which are all placed in the separate order Hymenoptera. Termites mostly feed on dead plant material, generally in the form of wood, leaf litter, soil, or animal dung, and about 10% of the estimated 4,000 species (about 2,600 taxonomically known) are economically significant as pests that can cause serious structural damage to buildings, crops or plantation forests. Termites are major detrivores, particularly in the subtropical and tropical regions, and their recycling of wood and other plant matter is of considerable ecological importance.

As eusocial insects, termites live in colonies that, at maturity, number from several hundred to several million individuals. They are a prime example of decentralised, self-organised systems using swarm intelligence and use this cooperation to exploit food sources and environments that could not be available to any single insect acting alone. A typical colony contains nymphs (semi-mature young), workers, soldiers, and reproductive individuals of both genders, sometimes containing several egg-laying queens.

Termites are sometimes called white ants

though they are unrelated to true ants.

A female that has flown, mated, and is producing eggs, is called a queen. Similarly, a male that has flown, mated, and remains in proximity to a queen, is termed a king. These anthropocentric terms have caused great misunderstanding of colony dynamics. Research using genetic techniques to determine relatedness of colony members is showing that the idea that colonies are only ever headed by a monogamous royal pair is wrong. Multiple pairs of reproductives within a colony are not uncommon. In the families Rhinotermitidae and Termitidae, and possibly others, sperm competition does not seem to occur (male genitalia are very simple and the sperm are anucleate), suggesting that only one male (king) generally mates within the colony.

At maturity, a primary queen has a great capacity to lay eggs. In physogastric species, the queen adds an extra set of ovaries with each moult, resulting in a greatly distended abdomen and increased fecundity, often reported to reach a production of more than two thousand eggs a day. The distended abdomen increases the queen's body length to several times more than before mating and reduces her ability to move freely, though attendant workers provide assistance. The queen is widely believed to be a primary source of pheromones useful in colony integration, and these are thought to be spread through shared feeding (trophallaxis).

The winged (or 'alate') caste, also referred to as the reproductive caste, are generally the only termites with well-developed eyes (although workers of some harvesting species do have well-developed compound eyes, and, in other species, soldiers with eyes occasionally appear). Termites on the path to becoming alates (going through incomplete metamorphosis) form a sub-caste in certain species of termites, functioning as workers ('pseudergates') and also as potential supplementary reproductives. Supplementaries have the ability to replace a dead primary reproductive and, at least in some species, several are recruited once a primary queen is lost.


Termite Trivia

What do you call a baby termite?
Answer: A baby termite is called a larva.

What do you call a female termite?
Answer: A female termite is called a cow.

What do you call a male termite?
Answer: A male termite is called a bull.

What do you call a group of termites?
Answer: A group of termites are called a colony, swarm.

Question: What class is a termite in?
Answer: A termite is in the invertebrate class.





close up termites or white ants ...
close up termites or white ants ...
 
 
 
close up termites or white ants
close up termites or white ants
 
 
 
termites life
termites life
 
 
 
termite isoptera isolated on...
termite isoptera isolated on...
 
 
 
termite
termite
 
 
 
worker and nasute termites
worker and nasute termites
 
 
 
close up termites or white ants
close up termites or white ants
 
 
 
termite isolated on white...
termite isolated on white...
 
 
 
old and grunge wood board was...
old and grunge wood board was...
 
 
 
the wood door with termites...
the wood door with termites...
 
 
 
action termite
action termite
 
 
 
the wood door with termites...
the wood door with termites...
 
 
 
the exterminator technicians...
the exterminator technicians...
 
 
 
termite
termite
 
 
 
vector black and white icons of ...
vector black and white icons of ...