Wolf
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Printing and Framing Wolf Prints (Artwork) for Your Home or Office

This page is designed to give you ideas on types of prints that might work and some general information around your chosen animal prints theme. Order prints and have them carefully rolled and safely secured in a cardboard cylinder and delivered to your door.



Mammal Animals:

Aardvark Prints | Alpaca Prints | American Bison Prints | Anteater Prints | Antelope Prints | Ape Prints | Armadillo Prints | Donkey Prints | Baboon Prints | Badger Prints | Bat Prints | Bear Prints | Beaver Prints | Bison Prints | Boar Prints | Buffalo Prints | Bush Baby Prints | Camel Prints | Caribou Prints | Cat Prints | Chamois Prints | Cheetah Prints | Chimpanzee Prints | Chinchilla Prints | Coyote Prints | Deer Prints | Dinosaur Prints | Dog Prints | Dolphin Prints | Dugong Prints | Echidna Prints | Eland Prints | Elephant Prints | Elephant Seal Prints | Elk Prints | Emu Prints | Ferret Prints | Fox Prints | Gaur Prints | Gazelle Prints | Gerbil Prints | Giant Panda Prints | Giraffe Prints | Gnu Prints | Goat Prints | Gopher Prints | Gorilla Prints | Guanaco Prints | Guinea Pig Prints | Hamster Prints | Hare Prints | Hedgehog Prints | Hippopotamus Prints | Human Prints | Hyena Prints | Jackal Prints | Jaguar Prints | Kangaroo Prints | Koala Prints | Kouprey Prints | Kudu Prints | Lemur Prints | Leopard Prints | Lion Prints | Llama Prints | Loris Prints | Manatee Prints | Meerkat Prints | Mink Prints | Mole Prints | Monkey Prints | Moose Prints | Mouse Prints | Mule Prints | Narwhal Prints | Okapi Prints | Opossum Prints | Oryx Prints | Otter Prints | Ox Prints | Panther Prints | Pig Prints | Platypus Prints | Pony Prints | Porcupine Prints | Porpoise Prints | Prairie Dog Prints | Rabbit Prints | Raccoon Prints | Ram Prints | Rat Prints | Red Deer Prints | Red Panda Prints | Rhinoceros Prints | Sea Lion Prints | Seal Prints | Serval Prints | Shark Prints | Sheep Prints | Shrew Prints | Skunk Prints | Squirrel Prints | Tapir Prints | Tarsier Prints | Tiger Prints | Turkey Prints | Vicuna Prints | Wallaby Prints | Walrus Prints | Water Buffalo Prints | Weasel Prints | Whale Prints | Wolf Prints | Wombat Prints | Yak Prints | Zebra Prints |

 

Wolf Prints

Young wolf name: cub, pup, whelp

Female wolf: bitch, shewolf

Male wolf: dog

A group of wolfs is called: pack, rout

Wolf classification: lupine

Wolf class: Mammal

The grey wolf or gray wolf (Canis lupus), also known as the timber wolf or simply wolf, is the largest wild member of the Canidae family. It is an ice age survivor originating during the Late Pleistocene around 300,000 years ago. DNA sequencing and genetic drift studies reaffirm that the gray wolf shares a common ancestry with the domestic dog, (Canis lupus familiaris) and is probably its ancestor, though certain aspects of this have been recently questioned. A number of other gray wolf subspecies have been identified, though the actual number of subspecies is still open to discussion. Gray wolves are typically apex predators in the ecosystems they occupy. Though not as adaptable as more generalist canid species, wolves have thrived in temperate forests, deserts, mountains, tundra, taiga, grasslands, and even urban areas.

Though once abundant over much of Eurasia and North America, the gray wolf inhabits a very small portion of its former range because of widespread destruction of its territory, human encroachment of its habitat, and the resulting human-wolf encounters that sparked broad extirpation. Considered as a whole, however, the gray wolf is regarded as being of least concern for extinction according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Today, wolves are protected in some areas, hunted for sport in others, or may be subject to extermination as perceived threats to livestock and pets.

In areas where human cultures and wolves are sympatric, wolves frequently feature in the folklore and mythology of those cultures, both positively and negatively.

Gray wolf weight and size can vary greatly worldwide, tending to increase proportionally with latitude as predicted by Bergmann's Rule. In general, height varies from 0.6 to .95 meters (2638 inches) at the shoulder and weight typically ranges from 20 (44 lb.) up to 68 (150 lb.) kilograms, which together make the gray wolf the largest of all wild canids. Although rarely encountered, extreme specimens of more than 77 kg (170 lb.) have been recorded in Alaska, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The heaviest gray wolf recorded in the New World was killed on 70 Mile River in east central Alaska on July 12, 1939 and weighed 79 kg (175 lb.), while the heaviest wolf recorded in the Old World was killed after World War II in the kobelyakski Area of the Poltavskij Region in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic and weighed 86 kg (189 lb.). The smallest wolves come from the Arabian Wolf subspecies, the females of which may weigh as little as 10 kg (22 lb) at maturity. Grey wolves are sexually dimorphic, with females in any given wolf population typically weighing 20% less than males. Females also have narrower muzzles and foreheads; slightly shorter, smoother furred legs; and less massive shoulders. Gray wolves can measure anywhere from 1.3 to 2 meters (4.56.5 feet) from nose to the tip of the tail, which itself accounts for approximately one quarter of overall body length.

Gray wolves are built for stamina, possessing features ideal for long-distance travel. Their narrow chests and powerful backs and legs facilitate efficient locomotion. They are capable of covering several miles trotting at about a pace of 10 km/h (6 mph), and have been known to reach speeds approaching 65 km/h (40 mph) during a chase. One female gray wolf was recorded to have made 7 metre bounds when chasing prey.

Gray wolf paws are able to tread easily on a wide variety of terrains, especially snow. There is a slight webbing between each toe, which allows them to move over snow more easily than comparatively hampered prey. Gray wolves are digitigrade, which, with the relative largeness of their feet, helps them to distribute their weight well on snowy surfaces. The front paws are larger than the hind paws, and have a fifth digit, the dewclaw, that is absent on hind paws. Bristled hairs and blunt claws enhance grip on slippery surfaces, and special blood vessels keep paw pads from freezing. Scent glands located between a wolf's toes leave trace chemical markers behind, helping the wolf to effectively navigate over large expanses while concurrently keeping others informed of its whereabouts. Unlike dogs and coyotes, gray wolves lack sweat glands on their paw pads. This trait is also present in Eastern Canadian Coyotes which have been shown to have recent wolf ancestry. Wolves in Israel are unique due to the middle two toes of their paws being fused, a trait originally thought to be unique to the African Wild Dog.

Fur coloration varies greatly, running from gray to gray-brown, all the way through the canine spectrum of white, red, brown, and black. These colors tend to mix in many populations to form predominantly blended individuals, though it is not uncommon for an individual or an entire population to be entirely one color (usually all black or all white). With the exception of Italy, in which black wolves can constitute 20-25% of the entire population, melanistic wolves rarely occur outside the North American continent. A multicolor coat characteristically lacks any clear pattern other than it tends to be lighter on the animal's underside. Fur color sometimes corresponds with a given wolf population's environment; for example, all-white wolves are much more common in areas with perennial snow cover. Aging wolves acquire a grayish tint in their coats. It is often thought that the coloration of the wolf's pelage serves as a functional form of camouflage. This may not be entirely correct, as some scientists have concluded that the blended colors have more to do with emphasizing certain gestures during interaction.


Wolf Trivia

What do you call a baby wolf?
Answer: A baby wolf is called a cub, pup, whelp.

What do you call a female wolf?
Answer: A female wolf is called a bitch, shewolf.

What do you call a male wolf?
Answer: A male wolf is called a dog.

What do you call a group of wolfs?
Answer: A group of wolfs are called a pack, rout.

Question: What is the scientific classification of a wolf?
Answer: A wolf has the scientific classification of lupine.

Question: What class is a wolf in?
Answer: A wolf is in the mammal class.





grey wolf  canis lupus ...
grey wolf canis lupus ...
 
 
 
howling wolf in the dark
howling wolf in the dark
 
 
 
silhouette of the wolf. vector...
silhouette of the wolf. vector...
 
 
 
the wolf face on white...
the wolf face on white...
 
 
 
a pack of wolves in snow
a pack of wolves in snow
 
 
 
wolf
wolf
 
 
 
a look straight into your soul...
a look straight into your soul...
 
 
 
old wilderness label with wolf...
old wilderness label with wolf...
 
 
 
timber wolf portrait. a close...
timber wolf portrait. a close...
 
 
 
black and white close up...
black and white close up...
 
 
 
timber wolf pack against white...
timber wolf pack against white...
 
 
 
three wolves marching together
three wolves marching together
 
 
 
 wolf abstract template logo...
wolf abstract template logo...
 
 
 
black silhouettes of howling...
black silhouettes of howling...
 
 
 
timber wolf standing in the snow
timber wolf standing in the snow